GLOBAL

Technology

If you can read this, you have to activate javascript for your browser. This extension was brought to you by TYPO3-Macher, die TYPO3-Agentur.
How is the user's energy conversion (kJoules) calculated on ergometers?

It is calculated based on the displayed (brake) output of the ergometer. The user only expends a small portion of his energy against the brake power. The larger part is produced as body heat. This share is included as efficiency in the following formula:

E [kJ] = (P x t / 1000) x 4 ; P = power [watts], t = time [s]

4 = efficiency of 25% on bicycle ergometers
6 = efficiency of 16.7% on cross-ergometers and rowing ergometers.

How is the user's energy conversion (kJoules) calculated on other machines?

On the following machines, the user's expended power is not directly recorded. That is why only principles of sport medicine need to be applied to the energy calculation. This involves only approximations!

Energy consumption on exercise bikes

From a sport medical perspective, cycling involves the following energy consumption: 1 hr of cycling at 24 km/h consumes 1680 kJ (at a medium brake level, e.g. 5 at a range of settings between 1 - 10).

Energy consumption on cross trainers

From a sport medical perspective, cross training involves the following energy consumption: 1 hr of cross training at 60 RPM (approx. 9.5 km/h) consumes 3344 kJ (at a medium brake level, e.g. 5 at a range of settings between 1 - 10).

Energy consumption on steppers

From a sport medical perspective, steppers involve the following energy consumption: 1 hr of training on the stepper at a step frequency of 90 steps per minute consumes 2500 kJ.

Energy consumption on rowing machines

From a sport medical perspective, rowing machines involve the following energy consumption: 1 hr of training on the rowing machine at a stroke speed of 40 strokes per minute consumes 2930 kJ.

Energy consumption on treadmills

From a sport medical perspective, rowing machines involve the following energy consumption: 1 hr of running at 6 km/h consumes 2520 kJ; 1 hr of running at 12 km/h consumes 3650 kJ.

The kilo-Joule value can be divided by 4.18 to convert it to kilo-calories.

Why is the pedal resistance always stronger on ergometers after the start of the recovery function?

The recovery function was carried out at the same time as a brake function. By increasing the brake resistance, the momentum is slowed to a complete standstill, in order to minimise the run-on time and noise produced by the flywheel. No training is meaningful within the recovery function from a therapeutic perspective. Use a low level of output to finish out your training.

What is the difference between rpm-independent and rpm-dependent ergometers?

On rpm-independent ergometers, the output setting is kept at a constant (in wide ranges of pedalling RPMs of approx. 40 -120 RPMs). On rpm-dependent ergometers, the currently-displayed output changes when changing the pedalling RPMs.